Tag Archives: prayer

The Price Of Compromise, The Wages Of Influence

The Price of Compromise
"Some cultures do not compromise. Take the example of Islam. Islam is now culture, now religion, now political system and now race. It can be anything, depending on the situation. However, Islam cannot change. You cannot water it down, reform it or modernize it.

sean-prayer
The Willfulness Of Strangers

The Qu'ran is emphatic that Islam is perfect (Q: 5:3). No Muslim will tolerate reforming his religion that was perfected by God. Consequently, the only culture that will have to give in to the point of extinction will be the Western culture."

Ali Sina

The Wages of Influence
"One facet of this sad disagreement, criticism, and rejection, of each other's religious beliefs, all of them, in the discourse that is not going so well, is to pray for the ancestors in the spirit world, that preceded the domination of their posterity who came under false ideology, of a bellicose, combative nature. The spirit world does not organize under falsehood forever. There used to be compartments of Presbyterianism, Methodism, etc, etc. but one of the tasks of the man born without blood ties to Satan is to open up the spirit world. People do not realize this, but pretty near all the people who have died are still influencing the world because of their selfishness. Even the relatively small segment of spirit world which claims a transcendent value perspective. Therefore Jesus went into the spirit world, and opened up the realm in which his antecedents pioneered. Prayer is one front on the unified front against false idols. Deep patient prayer. Not 20 minute prayers. We should appeal to the people that lived in the Middle East and Indonesia, that once existed, in regions, previously not dominated by Islam, as if they exist now, because they do, and their religion results in poverty, and eternal war, this prayer, can cause them to influence their dependents to gradually come more into line with the central theme of God's Providence. The spirit world with its many expressions of selfishness, compels people to be selfish, and to live in iniquity, and misfortune. God is interested in people's well being, if He was not there would be no reason to pursue Him. This is for people that are so inclined to prayer, but it must be coupled with what expands the body of Christ."

—Sean Creamer

China Cracks Down On Many Aspects Of Islam

Islam-in-China
CHINA. Beijing. Muslims worshiping at Niu Jie Mosque during Eid al Fitr, the festival marking the end of Ramadan. 2005

The Chinese government is attempting to limit prayer time and areas of worship for practicing Muslims in the northwestern part of the nation, which some see as an effort to control the growth of Islam. China officially outlaws most religious practices within its borders. Posted signs outside some mosques reportedly direct Muslims not to go longer than one half-hour in prayer and also not to pray outside of them, as well.

Khotan residents are also prohibited from worshipping at moques outside of their town, reportedly angering some citizens. People who are upset with the rules do not express their concerns, however, for fear of retribution from the government. China's rules on Islam stretch from public into other facets of life, as well, as only official versions of the Qur'an are acceptable to use and Imams are forbidden from teaching from the book in private.

Read these comments on the topic.

Also, in the southern regions of China live the troublesome Uighurs, a people whom old Russian travellers called Sart (a name which they used for sedentary, Turkish-speaking Muslims in general), while Western travellers called them Turki, in recognition of their language. The Chinese used to call them Ch'an-t'ou ('Turbaned Heads') but this term has been dropped, being considered derogatory, and the Chinese, using their own pronunciation, now called them Weiwuerh. As a matter of fact there was for centuries no 'national' name for them; people identified themselves with the oasis they came from, like Kashgar or Turfan.

A Mass Psychosis Of Alienation On The Rampage in Europe

Bern Muslims In Prayer
Hundreds of Bern Muslims Block City In Prayer
An armory of moxy Muslims demonstrate in Bern centre urging the public Islamization of the Swiss Confederation.

Imagine if George Bush had said this about his own allegiance towards evangelical Christianity.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stated Tuesday from Iran that rule of Islam on mankind is the only way for salvation of human beings. "There is no truth on earth but monotheism and following tenets of Islam and there is no way for salvation of mankind but rule of Islam over mankind," an unplacated Ahmadinejad said in a meeting with Afghan Sunni and Shiite ulama at Iranian Embassy in Kabul.

President Ahmadinejad said nations are today distancing themselves from culture of materialism and selfishness and look for a new way for their prosperity, that is the path of Islam.

He said that the world is on verge of a great upheaval and ulama at this juncture shoulder a heavy responsibility that is introducing genuine Islam as it is. "Nations today have no haven but religion," the Iranian president announced, cautioning Muslim nations against enemies' divisive plots.

He said, "All of us have the duty to resist the enemy by closing our ranks," adding that the Iranian nation today feels more than ever the need to stand beside the Afghan nation. "The Islamic Republic of Iran has kindly received their Afghan brothers and will continue to do so in future. Minor issues will cannot affect Iran's policies on Afghanistan."

The president said Islam belongs to all generations and Muslims should get ready for global mission of Islam.

The West must awaken from its slumber. A mass psychosis of alienation is on the rampage in Europe. The National Health Service in the U.K. is asking its employees not to eat lunch at their desks during Ramadan so as not to offend Muslims. Will this become yet another sacrifice forced upon indigenous British citizens to appease Muslims? I certainly hope not. Will it eventually become illegal to eat in a public place during Ramadan? is it just me, or are the English are willing to sacrifice almost anything to make Muslims happy, even though we know first hand that Muslims will never be happy until the whole globe in under sharia law, and the Sunnis have wiped out the Shi'ites, or vice versa.

Hourari Boumedienne, Algeria’s undisputed ruler until his death in 1978, said it clearly in a 1974 UN speech:

“One day, millions of men will leave the Southern Hemisphere to go to the Northern Hemisphere. And they will not go there as friends. Because they will go there to conquer it. And they will conquer it with their sons. The wombs of our women will give us victory.”

Listening To Americans Staying Alert

Listening to ordinary Americans told to stay alert is often overlooked by the powers of the air. The following first-hand report from reporter Annie Jacobsen is not unique, but it is important to note. She has since written a book describing her "probing" experience. There have since been many similar probes, which we never hear about in the mainstream media. So be diligent and do your homework. As Ms. Jacobsen puts it: "there's no one looking out for us."

prayer-in-the-air
Flying While Muslim...

On June 29, 2004, at 12:28 p.m., I flew on Northwest Airlines flight #327 from Detroit to Los Angeles with my husband and our young son. Also on our flight were 14 Middle Eastern men between the ages of approximately 20 and 50 years old. What I experienced during that flight has caused me to question whether the United States of America can realistically uphold the civil liberties of every individual, even non-citizens, and protect its citizens from terrorist threats. On that Tuesday, our journey began uneventfully. Starting out that morning in Providence, Rhode Island, we went through security screening, flew to Detroit, and passed the time waiting for our connecting flight to Los Angeles by shopping at the airport stores and eating lunch at an airport diner. With no second security check required in Detroit we headed to our gate and waited for the pre-boarding announcement. Standing near us, also waiting to pre-board, was a group of six Middle Eastern men. They were carrying blue passports with Arabic writing. Two men wore tracksuits with Arabic writing across the back. Two carried musical instrument cases—thin, flat, 18 long. One wore a yellow T-shirt and held a McDonald's bag. And the sixth man had a bad leg—he wore an orthopedic shoe and limped. When the pre-boarding announcement was made, we handed our tickets to the Northwest Airlines agent, and walked down the jetway with the group of men directly behind us.

My four-year-old son was determined to wheel his carry-on bag himself, so I turned to the men behind me and said, You go ahead, this could be awhile. No, you go ahead, one of the men replied. He smiled pleasantly and extended his arm for me to pass. He was young, maybe late 20's and had a goatee. I thanked him and we boarded the plan.

Once on the plane, we took our seats in coach (seats 17A, 17B and 17C). The man with the yellow shirt and the McDonald's bag sat across the aisle from us (in seat 17E). The pleasant man with the goatee sat a few rows back and across the aisle from us (in seat 21E). The rest of the men were seated throughout the plane, and several made their way to the back.

As we sat waiting for the plane to finish boarding, we noticed another large group of Middle Eastern men boarding. The first man wore a dark suit and sunglasses. He sat in first class in seat 1A, the seat second-closet to the cockpit door. The other seven men walked into the coach cabin. As aware Americans, my husband and I exchanged glances, and then continued to get comfortable. I noticed some of the other passengers paying attention to the situation as well. As boarding continued, we watched as, one by one, most of the Middle Eastern men made eye contact with each other. They continued to look at each other and nod, as if they were all in agreement about something. I could tell that my husband was beginning to feel anxious.

The take-off was uneventful. But once we were in the air and the seatbelt sign was turned off, the unusual activity began. The man in the yellow T-shirt got out of his seat and went to the lavatory at the front of coach—taking his full McDonald's bag with him. When he came out of the lavatory he still had the McDonald's bag, but it was now almost empty. He walked down the aisle to the back of the plane, still holding the bag. When he passed two of the men sitting mid-cabin, he gave a thumbs-up sign. When he returned to his seat, he no longer had the McDonald's bag.

Then another man from the group stood up and took something from his carry-on in the overhead bin. It was about a foot long and was rolled in cloth. He headed toward the back of the cabin with the object. Five minutes later, several more of the Middle Eastern men began using the forward lavatory consecutively. In the back, several of the men stood up and used the back lavatory consecutively as well.

For the next hour, the men congregated in groups of two and three at the back of the plane for varying periods of time. Meanwhile, in the first class cabin, just a foot or so from the cockpit door, the man with the dark suit—still wearing sunglasses—was also standing. Not one of the flight crew members suggested that any of these men take their seats.

Watching all of this, my husband was now beyond anxious. I decided to try to reassure my husband (and maybe myself) by walking to the back bathroom. I knew the goateed-man I had exchanged friendly words with as we boarded the plane was seated only a few rows back, so I thought I would say hello to the man to get some reassurance that everything was fine. As I stood up and turned around, I glanced in his direction and we made eye contact. I threw out my friendliest remember-me-we-had-a-nice-exchange-just-a-short-time-ago smile. The man did not smile back. His face did not move. In fact, the cold, defiant look he gave me sent shivers down my spine.

When I returned to my seat I was unable to assure my husband that all was well. My husband immediately walked to the first class section to talk with the flight attendant. I might be overreacting, but I've been watching some really suspicious things... Before he could finish his statement, the flight attendant pulled him into the galley. In a quiet voice she explained that they were all concerned about what was going on. The captain was aware. The flight attendants were passing notes to each other. She said that there were people on board higher up than you and me watching the men. My husband returned to his seat and relayed this information to me. He was feeling slightly better. I was feeling much worse. We were now two hours into a four-in-a-half hour flight.

Approximately 10 minutes later, that same flight attendant came by with the drinks cart. She leaned over and quietly told my husband there were federal air marshals sitting all around us. She asked him not to tell anyone and explained that she could be in trouble for giving out that information. She then continued serving drinks.

About 20 minutes later the same flight attendant returned. Leaning over and whispering, she asked my husband to write a description of the yellow-shirted man sitting across from us. She explained it would look too suspicious if she wrote the information. She asked my husband to slip the note to her when he was done.

imams-lawsuit-us-airways
Thugs in a suit. Nothing new here. We call them gangsters.

After seeing 14 Middle Eastern men board separately (six together, eight individually) and then act as a group, watching their unusual glances, observing their bizarre bathroom activities, watching them congregate in small groups, knowing that the flight attendants and the pilots were seriously concerned, and now knowing that federal air marshals were on board, I was officially terrified. Before I'm labeled a racial profiler or—worse yet—a racist, let me add this. A month ago I traveled to India to research a magazine article I was writing. My husband and I flew on a jumbo jet carrying more than 300 Hindu and Muslim men and women on board. We traveled throughout the country and stayed in a Muslim village 10 miles outside Pakistan. I never once felt fearful. I never once felt unsafe. I never once had the feeling that anyone wanted to hurt me. This time was different.

Finally, the captain announced that the plane was cleared for landing. It had been four hours since we left Detroit. The fasten seat belt light came on and I could see downtown Los Angeles. The flight attendants made one final sweep of the cabin and strapped themselves in for landing. I began to relax. Home was in sight.

Suddenly, seven of the men stood up—in unison—and walked to the front and back lavatories. One by one, they went into the two lavatories, each spending about four minutes inside. Right in front of us, two men stood up against the emergency exit door, waiting for the lavatory to become available. The men spoke in Arabic among themselves and to the man in the yellow shirt sitting nearby. One of the men took his camera into the lavatory. Another took his cell phone. Again, no one approached the men. Not one of the flight attendants asked them to sit down. I watched as the man in the yellow shirt, still in his seat, reached inside his shirt and pulled out a small red book. He read a few pages, then put the book back inside his shirt. He pulled the book out again, read a page or two more, and put it back. He continued to do this several more times.

I looked around to see if any other passengers were watching. I immediately spotted a distraught couple seated two rows back. The woman was crying into the man's shoulder. He was holding her hand. I heard him say to her, You've got to calm down. Behind them sat the once pleasant-smiling, goatee-wearing man.

I grabbed my son, I held my husband's hand and, despite the fact that I am not a particularly religious person, I prayed. The last man came out of the bathroom, and as he passed the man in the yellow shirt he ran his forefinger across his neck and mouthed the word No.

The plane landed. My husband and I gathered our bags and quickly, very quickly, walked up the jetway. As we exited the jetway and entered the airport, we saw many, many men in dark suits. A few yards further out into the terminal, LAPD agents ran past us, heading for the gate. I have since learned that the representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), the Federal Air Marshals (FAM), and the Transportation Security Association (TSA) met our plane as it landed. Several men—who I presume were the federal air marshals on board—hurried off the plane and directed the 14 men over to the side.

Knowing what we knew, and seeing what we'd seen, my husband and I decided to talk to the authorities. For several hours my husband and I were interrogated by the FBI. We gave sworn statement after sworn statement. We wrote down every detail of our account. The interrogators seemed especially interested in the McDonald's bag, so we repeated in detail what we knew about the McDonald's bag. A law enforcement official stood near us, holding 14 Syrian passports in his hand. We answered more questions. And finally we went home.