Sarah Palin's Buoyant March To Washington

A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO former Republican Party VP candidate, Sarah Palin, is a recent YouTube sensation. The video went viral Monday, burning up Twitter and popping up on various news and entertainment websites.

The tribute song is set to the tune of the famous Civil War-era 'Battle Hymn of the Republic.' According to credits posted on YouTube, the song was written by Tom Dempsey and sung by Gary Mcvay.

The song is an anthem to Sarah Palin in particular, and the Tea Party in general, although the song is not officially affiliated with Gov. Palin nor her organization in any way.

Sarah Palin's Hymn of the Republic Lyrics:

She’s a cold blast from Alaska,
Ingrained with common sense.
She’s not a Harvard lawyer,
but she knew what the Founders meant.
A cold blast from the North,
That freezes Congress in their tracks.
With God and the Tea party, she’s gonna take it back.
Sarah Palin, she won’t listen to their bunk.
Sarah Palin’s coming south to hunt some skunk.
Sarah Palin, she’ll throw them all in jail.
And when she gets to Washington, it’ll be cold as hell.
Sarah has the wisdom to walk through an open door.
She’s stomping out the wretches where the evil lies in store.
She will scrub the floors and sweep the riff-raff into cracks.
With God and the Tea party, she’s gonna take it back.
Sarah Palin, she won’t listen to their bunk.
Sarah Palin’s coming south to hunt some skunk.
Sarah Palin, she’ll throw them all in jail.
And when she gets to Washington, it’ll be cold as hell.

Spoken:
Congress pats themselves from some new bill they just passed.
I watch as my freedom slowly runs through an hourglass.
They think they spend our money better than we do.
But they can talk until they’re blue and old.
Cos if they ever gave us anything,
They always wanted something in return, Sarah knows.
Sarah's marching on on.

Closing dedication:
“I’d like to dedicate that to the Tea Party and all the patriots.”

Ilood libel speech? Who cares? Today has been a fabulous day for SP fans, and here's part two of that fabulous in an article posted by Adam Katz of the Generative Anthropology Summer Conference:

"I will lay down a marker right away—for me, the main criterion for supporting a Presidential candidate is that he or she knows what the left is; anyone who thinks that a Republican president will be able to settle into the White House in 2013, put on the green eyeshades, and start balancing the budget in a sober, bipartisan manner is criminally naïve, and I don’t want anyone like that anywhere near the Presidency."

spalin4

Sarah Palin

Normal America and free America are at war with the Left, and anyone one who is not ready to fire back when fired at need not apply. Sarah Palin seems to know what the Left is, and none of her potential contenders seems to have a clue. At this moment, the ability to create and run a political and economic media empire is more pertinent to presidential aspirations than the ability to balance a budget with your bare hands, which you can hire someone to do anyway.

But leaving that aside, Palin, and the Palin phenomenon are intrinsically interesting—there seems to be widespread agreement on that, at any rate. She, in her public persona, seems to me an almost perfect complement to Barack Obama, and the Obama phenomenon—she seems destined to be his nemesis, a role she seems to relish and which she plays very well. I think an Obama v. Palin race in 2012 would dramatize all the post-Bush, indeed, all the post-9/11 conflicts; even more, it would finally bring the entire Progressive Era in our politics, dating back to the turn of the 20th century, on the stage—and I think this would be both very healthy and incredibly exciting. We desperately need such a polarization now, and it would be nice to deal a blow to the illusions of the “fiscally conservative, socially liberal center” of the country. I don’t doubt that there are many Americans, maybe, depending upon definitions, a majority, who can be described as “fiscally conservative, socially liberal”; nor do I doubt that in a certain sense they are the “center,” picking and suturing together the least antagonistic items of both right and left.

It’s an empty center, though, and a campaign that showed as much by forcing the “centrists” to choose would be healthy as well—if you support the kind of judicially driven federal government needed to push through and sustain the “socially liberal” agenda, than you can forget about fiscal conservatism. Fiscal conservatism would mean federalism and expanded property rights, both of which, as the politically savvy know, mean death to “social liberalism,” i.e., abortion on demand, gay marriage and religion out of the public sphere. And I might as well also say that I can’t say the word “gravitas” without, at the very least, smiling. I think that things are going to get rough, especially if the prerogatives of those plugged into the victimary public arena are even mentioned, much less trespassed upon—we need someone whose first instinct isn’t to placate the New York Times.

Read it all. And here is another Katz exploration into the amazing Obama-Palin dichotomy.

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill

We are fortunate to be able to peel back the layers of time to find that dual juggernauts Winston Churchill and George Orwell summed up so-called intellectuals so succinctly, how they are a weakening force because firstly everyone assumes what they say is right because they've got a reputation as intellectuals, even when they're wrong, and that believing these intellectuals can have such dire consequences. He said it about Britain but it could so easily be any Western country today. Here's what Winston Churchill said about them 78 years ago:

"Historians have noticed, all down the centuries, one peculiarity of the English people, which has cost them dear. We have always thrown away after a victory the greater part of the advantages we had gained in the struggle. The worst difficulties from which we suffer do not come from without. They come from within. They do not come from the cottages of the wage earners; they come from a peculiar type of brainy people, always found in our country, who, if they add something to its culture, take much from its strength. Our difficulties come from the mood of unwarrantable self-abasement, into which we have been cast, by a powerful section of our own intellectuals. They come from the acceptance of defeatist doctrines by a large proportion of our politicians. But what have they to offer, but a vague internationalism, a squalid materialism, and the promise of impossible utopias? Nothing can save England if she will not save herself. If we lose faith in ourselves, in our capacity to guide and govern, if we lose our will to live, then indeed our story is told." – Winston Churchill, 1933

Of course, words being words, and the bird's the word, George Orwell, Dwight D Eisenhower and Albert Camus summed up the so-called intellectual elite, a group of talkers and writers who often mistake their years of practice and subsequent compensation for a certain collegial profundity of thought whenever they open their mouths or commit their pens and keyboards with these jostling texts:

  • You must be an intellectual. Only an intellectual could say something so stupid. —George Orwell
  • An intellectual is someone whose mind watches itself. —Albert Camus
  • I heard a definition of an intellectual, that I thought was very interesting: a man who takes more words than are necessary to tell more than he knows. —Dwight D. Eisenhower

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